Although U.S. automakers were still struggling with a poor economy and auto sales were lower than pre-Depression levels, Ford Motor Company bravely invested in a brighter tomorrow with its larger, more streamlined, and voluptuous ’35 models. Unhappy with the designs offered by his employer, Briggs Body Corporation, Phil Wright (who designed the radical Pierce-Arrow Silver Arrow) worked up a design proposal at home and showed it to his boss Ralph Roberts, who passed the sketches to an appreciative Edsel Ford. The market quickly responded. The new ’35 Ford outsold Chevrolet by more than 150,000 units for the first time in many years, partly due to a strike at Chevrolet. But the new Fords were handsome, powerful, and more contemporary-looking than their GM counterparts. On a 4-inch-longer wheelbase, with a distinctive canted grille and softly rounded fenders, the ’35s had lots of eye appeal. The flathead V-8 developed more horsepower than a Stovebolt six, and the Ford weighed several hundred pounds less than a Chevy, so it was quicker and more lively. Ford’s new look compensated for the fact that Henry stubbornly clung to mechanical brakes and rigid axles. Arguably the two best-loo...